The role of consortia and societies in implementing pharmacogenomics or pharmacogenetic testings in routine clinic


The implementation of pharmacogenomics/pharmacogenetics (PGx) into routine clinical practice is becoming more common nowadays because of the availability of clinical guidelines describing the utilization of pharmacogenetics test results to optimize drug and dose selection to enable safer, with more benefit and cost-effective treatment (1). Research in PGx started many decades ago but the implementation of the PGx in the clinic has started to emerge in last ten years as a result of various initiative taken up by the PGx associations. The genotyping methods are broadly classified into reactive and pre-emptive clinical genotyping (2). Many medical institutes have ensured the reactive utilization of PGx tests for high risk drugs or costly drugs as and when required, however, the sparing use of the PGx not only increases the cost but also not effective when there is a need to prescribe the medication urgently. ...................................................................................................................................................................................The pre-emptive translation of the PGx research has always remained a challenge, but the effort of implementation will bring more knowledge in this field and will add more information by improving the solution strategy of many PGx implementation related issues. In the recent years, initiatives of PGx implementation have been started in Europe, United States (US), and Asia. Twenty-seven different institutions in the US are involved in many programs for implementation of pharmacogenomics and few of these initiatives have been running for more than 10 years. In the year 2007, establishment of the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network was initiated by a huge network of several consortia. Later these consortia and the Pharmacogenomics Research Network (PGRN) initiated eMERGE-PGx study for testing genetic variation in 82 pharmacogenes with targeted sequencing and 5639 samples sequenced from nine eMERGE sites until February 2015 (3, 4). ........................................................................................ References:............................................................. 1. Relling MV, Evans WE. Pharmacogenomics in the clinic. Nature. 2015;526(7573):343-50. 2. Arwood MJ, Chumnumwat S, Cavallari LH, Nutescu EA, Duarte JD. Implementing pharmacogenomics at your institution: establishment and overcoming implementation challenges. Clinical and translational science. 2016;9(5):233. 3. Gottesman O, Kuivaniemi H, Tromp G, Faucett WA, Li R, Manolio TA, et al. The electronic medical records and genomics (eMERGE) network: past, present, and future. Genetics in Medicine. 2013;15(10):761. 4. Bush WS, Crosslin DR, Owusu?Obeng A, Wallace J, Almoguera B, Basford MA, et al. Genetic variation among 82 pharmacogenes: the PGRNseq data from the eMERGE network. Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics. 2016;100(2):160-9.

Posted On:27/12/2019




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